DRR Expert Forum 2015 Antalya Statement

DRR Expert Forum 2015 Antalya Statement

To view translated versions click here More »

The Antalya Report

The Antalya Report

In February 2015 a USAID-funded Expert Forum was assembled in Antalya, Turkey to address why societies are not learning from the lessons that emerged from coping with and responding to previous disasters. More »

Expert  Forum  DRR  Video – Antalya, Turkey

Expert Forum DRR Video – Antalya, Turkey

Disasters occur when natural extremes encounter communities who are ill-prepared to cope with these forces. Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) strategies outline preventative measures to reduce the impacts of foreseeable hazardous events. Time More »

Lessons Learned about Lessons Learned about DRR in a Changing Climate (Sendai, Japan)

Lessons Learned about Lessons Learned about DRR in a Changing Climate (Sendai, Japan)

In Sendai, Japan, “Lessons Learned about Lessons Learning about DRR in a Changing Climate” is held on 15th March from 3pm to 5pm at Meeting Room 7(会議室7) in Sendai Civic Auditorium (仙台市民会館) More »

DRR Expert Forum 2015 and the Resulting Antalya Statement

DRR Expert Forum 2015 and the Resulting Antalya Statement

The Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) Expert Forum 2015 was held in Antalya, Turkey the 10th – 13th of February 2015. Ninety participants attended the Forum from 43 countries, drawn from government agencies, More »

 

Workshop will help Hawaii residents prepare for natural disasters

japan-tsunami-earthquake-hits-northeast-whirlpool_33139_600x450

By Bret Yager, West Hawaii Today

The forces of nature that help make Hawaii an interesting place to live can turn deadly at the drop of a hat. The island has been washed with tsunami, wracked by earthquakes, hit head on by a tropical storm and brushed by hurricanes.

And there’s always the lava. It stopped on the very outskirts of Pahoa in 2014, and though it tends to move slowly, the 1950 Mauna Loa lava flows in South Kona and Ka‘u are proof the volcanoes can send thousands of tons of molten rock to the ocean in a matter of a few hours.

It’s better to prepare for next time like it’ll happen tomorrow than to hope history won’t repeat itself.

That’s the underlying message of a natural disaster preparedness workshop to be held 9-11:30 a.m. July 9 at the West Hawaii Civic Center Council Chambers. Kona Rep. Nicole Lowen and District 1 Rep. Mark Nakashima are teaming up with Civil Defense, the National Weather Service and University of Hawaii Sea Grant to help people get a handle on preparations for emergency supply kits, plans for evacuating and sheltering in place, insurance issues and home retrofitting.

Given that the island’s emergency shelters have enough space for only a fraction of Hawaii County residents, that many homes are single-wall and not built to withstand heavy wind or shaking, and that a sudden blow to power lines, roads and other infrastructure won’t be quickly repaired — being prepared to withstand a couple of weeks without much assistance from the outside is a smart idea, emergency officials have maintained.

Nearly 200 Big Island residents and visitors took shelter at Kealakehe High School ahead of the anticipated arrival of Tropical Storm Iselle in 2014. (Chelsea Jensen/West Hawaii Today)

Nearly 200 Big Island residents and visitors took shelter at Kealakehe High School ahead of the anticipated arrival of Tropical Storm Iselle in 2014. (Chelsea Jensen/West Hawaii Today)

Ed Teixeira said that increasing shelter capacity is one of his top priorities in his new post as chief of Hawaii County Civil Defense. There are 32 emergency shelter sites around the Big Island, some of them comprised of multiple buildings like schools. Hawaii Emergency Management pegs their capacity at around 44,000 individuals.

“It’s important to increase capacity,” Teixeira said.

He’ll be talking nuts and bolts of disaster preparation in July 9, giving an overview of what residents should expect at shelters and touching on lessons learned from Tropical Storm Iselle, among other topics.

“It’s the beginning of hurricane season, so what better time to be prepared?” Lowen said. “We dodged a bullet last year with so many storms and no direct hits, but we can’t expect we’ll always be so lucky. Being prepared in advance saves lives and taxpayer dollars too.”

Article here

Cover Image Credit

Rethinking Home: Climate Change in New York and Samoa

Screen Shot 2016-07-06 at 2.38.47 PM

Communities in Samoa and New York both face challenges to home and homelands from the increasing severity of climate‐changed weather systems. Between September 2013 and July 2014, a group of Samoans and New Yorkers, with homes in coastal areas impacted by hurricanes, worked together to share and learn from their personal and community experiences of climate change.

The groups approached the issue by focusing on houses and the idea of home. In workshops we explored how our houses define us; how they either succeed or fail in sheltering us; and might adapt in the future.

Practical sessions in May and June 2014 centered on the traditional house of Samoa and on rebuilding after Hurricane Sandy in Staten Island. The teams have kept in touch with each other through discussions in Facebook and on the project’s blog (see link on this page). We are now working on material for schools and a publication. The project has created a strong cross-cultural exchange and we feel it has strengthened participants’ personal resources for dealing with climate change.

See full report here

Article

Developing nations to get ‘tailor-made’ advice on climate action

Screen Shot 2016-07-06 at 2.29.50 PM

BY MEGAN ROWLING

Wed Jul 6, 2016

BARCELONA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – For developing countries seeking to turn their national climate action plans into reality, help will soon be at hand in the form of a support service announced by the German government and the U.S.-based World Resources Institute this week.

The global partnership, open to all countries, aims to provide developing states with the expertise they need to transform their targets to reduce planet-warming emissions into concrete strategies and measures.

Close to 190 countries have submitted plans to tackle climate change over the next 15 years – known as “intended nationally determined contributions” (INDCs) – under a new U.N. agreement reached in Paris in December.

Now, with the prospect of that deal coming into force earlier than expected – potentially this year or next – the pressure is on to work out how to put country pledges into practice.

“We now have to achieve the targets we have set ourselves and to breathe life into the Paris Agreement,” said German Environment Minister Barbara Hendricks in a statement

“We are ready to support developing countries in tackling this challenge and to share our experience with them. This should also give our partner countries new opportunities for development,” she added.

The German government said one of the main tasks of the initiative would be to organize quick access to “tailor-made advice” for developing countries, drawing on know-how and technical assistance from a range of organizations and experts.

The partnership – which will have offices in Washington and Bonn, funded by Germany – will also offer a contact point for climate-related questions, such as on expanding the use of renewable energies, sustainable urban development or climate-resilient agriculture.

Developing nations, donor governments, international institutions and non-governmental organizations will participate, sharing and coordinating knowledge and support.

CONNECTING THE DOTS

Pankaj Bhatia, acting director of the climate program at the World Resources Institute, said many countries had put forward “excellent” climate action plans, but lacked the skills and resources to roll them out.

“They need to turn these INDCs into implementation roadmaps and that in itself is going to be an important capacity-building need,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Many of the high-level goals set out in each country’s plan apply across the economy, so the task now is to work out how to split up and deliver emissions reductions from different sectors, including energy, transport, agriculture and forestry, Bhatia added.

Yet while developing countries face big challenges, many schemes have been set up to help them, such as the Low Emission Development Strategies Global Partnership, which unites over 160 countries and international programs.

The aim of the new initiative is not to reinvent the wheel, Bhatia said, but to facilitate access for developing nations to suitable expertise and advice, as well as filling in any gaps.

“Already there are many good initiatives in place and there is a need to connect the dots; there is a need to tap into the synergies offered by these initiatives; and there is a need to avoid duplication and increase efficiency in terms of coordination between various efforts,” he explained.

Jennifer Morgan, executive director of Greenpeace International who was at the Petersberg Climate Dialogue where the partnership was unveiled, said support for national climate action plans should be “as robust and quick as possible”.

“INDCs have been put on the table, but the linkages between funding them and getting implementation going is still in the early stages. This is trying to kick-start that,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Germany said the partnership also aimed to bring climate and development goals closer together, and to harmonize different donor programs.

It will be officially launched at the U.N. climate conference in Marrakesh in November.

(Reporting by Megan Rowling; editing by Laurie Goering. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women’s rights, trafficking, corruption and climate change. Visit news.trust.org)

Article

A La Nina Summit – A Review of the Causes and Consequences of Cold Events

Introduction

The workshop on “A Review of the Causes and Consequences of Cold Events: A La Niña Summit” was convened in Boulder, Colorado (USA) on 15-17 July 1998. Michael Glantz, Senior Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR and convener of the workshop, opened the La Niña Summit. He welcomed the 80 participants from 14 countries on behalf of the United Nations University (UNU), the UN Environment Program (UNEP), NCAR, and the US National Science Foundation S G). He noted that  the discussions of the La Niña Summit would be carried real-time in audio and on the Internet by the Exploratorium (San Francisco, California) at http://www.exploratorium.ed/la_nina. He introduced Dr. Richard Anthes, President of UCAR (University Corpora -ion for Atmospheric Research), who welcomed the participants to the first works focused on La Niña, cold events in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Anthes commented on the importance of La Niña and El Niño research and its potential benefits to societies around the globe.

Peter E.O. Usher, Head of UNEP’s Atmosphere Unit (Nairobi, Kenya), greeted the participants on behalf of the UN sponsoring agencies, the UNU and UNEP. He recounted the history of UNEP’s concern with the ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) cycle since the mid-1980s, when UNEP, in cooperation with NCAR, formed the UNEP Working Group on the Socioeconomic Impacts Associated with ENSO. He mentioned the numerous workshops and publications carried out by the Working Group. He also noted that ENSO research served as a bridge between the climate change and the climate variability research communities.

Glantz then highlighted to the participants the reasons for convening the La Niña Summit. He noted that the overriding goal of the Summit was to encourage a review of the causes and the physical and societal consequences of La Niña (cold) events and to identify what was known and not known by researchers about La Niña and to identify what societies need to know about the phenomenon. The reason to know more about La Niña (and El Niño) is to improve the reliability and credibility of ENSO-related forecasts so that societies could better prepare themselves for their adverse, as well as beneficial, impacts. It was a first attempt to have scientists focus on La Niña, through their discussions with forecasters, social scientists, climate impacts and forecast application researchers and to help to identify and lay out what potential users of La Niña information (including La Niña forecasts) might be able to consider as reliable information about cold events.

This workshop was NOT an attempt to forecast whether the recent strong 1997-98 El Niño would be replaced by a La Niña, when that replacement might be expected to take place, the magnitude of the potential La Niña, or what La Niña’s impacts on particular societies and ecosystems might be.

The idea to convene such a workshop was developed very early in 1998 and was in direct response to the media coverage (some say hype) of the 1997-98 El Niño event, one of the biggest in a century, and to the beginning of talk of the eventual development of a strong La Niña event later in the year. It had become clear from media coverage and interviews with scientists that much less was known about La Niña and its possible societal impacts in comparison to El Niño. For whatever reason, it was a phenomenon that had not received much scientific or media attention in the past couple of decades.

Another workshop objective was to bring together as many as possible of the key El Niño researchers and representatives of the climate-information-user community to discuss what was known about La Niña’s scientific dimensions and societal impacts. In addition, representatives of the media were invited to the workshop as participants as well as potential reporters of its proceedings. Media interest in the summit was surprisingly high. With respect to educating the public about La Niña (or cold events), we (i.e., physical, biological, and social scientists and the media) are in a good position to identify and avoid some of the false expectations that would likely accompany the misperceptions and misinformation about La Niña.

As has been suggested in the popular literature, the extremes of the ENSO (warm/cold event) process in the equatorial Pacific are among the major climate-related disrupters of human activities, bringing droughts, floods, and other severe meteorological events to various parts of the globe. The more that societies learn about the entire ENSO process, the better prepared they can become to cope with the regional extreme events that tend to accompany it.

The following sections of this report present information from each of the workshop sessions in the order in which they appeared in the agenda: A Review of the 1997-98 El Niño Event, Definition(s) of La Niña, What Constitutes Normal, La Niña Teleconnections, The Impacts of La Niña on Specific Countries and Sectors, Climate Change and the ENSO Process, Symmetry Issues, Attribution of Impacts to ENSO Extremes, Media Panel, Forecasting the 1997-98 El Niño, Forecasting the Onset of a La Niña in 1998-99, Differences in Forecasting El Niño and La Niña, and Monitoring La Niña. It is important to note that the information presented under each topic was not mutually exclusive and was frequently referred to in other sessions as well. Thus, similar issues were raised in more than one section.

View report below or download it here

 

Living with Climate Change: Will Paris Make a Difference?

Dale Jamieson, Professor of Environmental Studies and Philosophy, New York University and Jennifer Jacquet, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, New York University. The twenty-first Conference of the Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Paris ended with an agreement that some call “the world’s greatest diplomatic success” while others insist it is “too weak” and full of “false hope.” This talk examines the challenges in assuring the agreement’s success, which ultimately rests not just on nations, but also on civil society and corporations.

Living with Climate Change: Will Paris Make a Difference?  

1997-98 El Niño Impacts – El Niño: Spawner of Hazards

Spawner of Hazards

Chile Earthquake

Tsunami Waves Reach Japan After Deadly Magnitude-8.3 Earthquake Rocks Chile

By weather.com Published Sep 18 2015 07:23 AM EDT Associated Press
Street Flooded with People During Evacuation Caused by Chile Earthquake. Streets are mobbed with people trying to evacuate, the evacuation was brought on by an 8.3 magnitude earthquake of the coast of Chile. Small tsunami waves reached the Japanese coast Friday morning, one day after a magnitude 8.3 earthquake struck offshore Chile and killed at least 12 people. The Japan Meteorological Agency said a wave of 80 centimeters (31 inches) was recorded in the port of Kuji in Iwate prefecture, part of the same northeast region hit by a much larger and deadly tsunami in March 2011.

No injury or damages have been reported from the waves, but some coastal towns have issued evacuation advisories as a precautionary step.

The first reports of tsunami waves came from Iwate Prefecture around 6:20 a.m. local time Friday. By 7:30 a.m., tsunami waves as high as 0.4 meter (1.3 feet) had been reported at Kujikō in Iwate Prefecture as well as at Erimo on the northern island of Hokkaido.

The agency issued a tsunami advisory before dawn Friday for Japan’s entire Pacific coast, from Hokkaido in the north to Okinawa in the south.

Agency official Yohei Hasegawa said the waves reached northern Japan first and were moving toward the southwest. He said the agency expects the swelling of the waves would continue for a while and could go as high as 1 meter (40 inches), and urged residents to stay away from the coast.

Smaller waves have been detected across the country, up to 50 centimeters (20 inches) in Erimo on Hokkaido and 20 centimeters (8 inches) in Fukushima prefecture, home to the nuclear power plant destroyed by the 2011 disaster.

The northern Japanese coasts, especially those in Iwate, have been affected by tsunami induced by earthquakes near Chile in the past. In 1960, a tsunami exceeding 5 meters (16 feet) hit the area, leaving 139 people dead.

Quake Triggers Pacific-Wide Tsunami

The first tsunami waves struck Chile just minutes after the quake, and have since been fanning out across much of the Pacific Ocean. Outside of Chile, the highest observed tsunami waves have been in French Polynesia, a cluster of islands in the South Pacific; a 4.5-foot tsunami was reported at Nuku Hiva in that country’s Marquesas Islands at 7:33 a.m. U.S. EDT Thursday.

In the Hawaiian Islands, tsunami waves early Thursday morning reached a magnitude of 3 feet at Hilo and 2.2 feet in Kahului, Maui. The peak waves struck the state between 4 and 5 a.m. local time (9 and 10 a.m. EDT). A very small tsunami of just over 2 inches was also measured at Honolulu.

The Pacific Typhoon Warning Center has since canceled the tsunami advisory for Hawaii. Local officials urged people to stay off the beach and out of the water Thursday.

The U.S. government’s National Tsunami Warning Center also issued a tsunami advisory for Southern California, including coastal areas of the counties of San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Orange. The advisory was canceled at 12:19 p.m. PDT.

NTWC said tsunami waves were measured along most of the California coast. The highest measured tsunami wave was at Ventura, where the sea level peaked 1.1 feet above normal tide levels.

A tide gauge at Santa Monica, California, measured the initial tsunami wave early Thursday morning, with a fluctuation of about one foot in less than 15 minutes, according to the National Weather Service in Oxnard.

Very small tsunami waves were observed even farther north. Port Orford, Oregon, reported a 3-inch tsunami at 9:06 a.m. PDT. In Alaska, tsunami waves of around half a foot were measured at Nikolski and Sand Point early Thursday afternoon.

Such waves are not a danger to those on land, but they can create unusual and dangerous currents posing a danger to swimmers and boaters.

See full Article Here

Tsunami Waves Reach Japan After Deadly Magnitude-8.3 Earthquake Rocks Chile

112_chile_sept17

By weather.com Published Sep 18 2015 07:23 AM EDT Associated Press

Street Flooded with People During Evacuation Caused by Chile Earthquake. Streets are mobbed with people trying to evacuate, the evacuation was brought on by an 8.3 magnitude earthquake of the coast of Chile. Small tsunami waves reached the Japanese coast Friday morning, one day after a magnitude 8.3 earthquake struck offshore Chile and killed at least 12 people. The Japan Meteorological Agency said a wave of 80 centimeters (31 inches) was recorded in the port of Kuji in Iwate prefecture, part of the same northeast region hit by a much larger and deadly tsunami in March 2011.

No injury or damages have been reported from the waves, but some coastal towns have issued evacuation advisories as a precautionary step.

The first reports of tsunami waves came from Iwate Prefecture around 6:20 a.m. local time Friday. By 7:30 a.m., tsunami waves as high as 0.4 meter (1.3 feet) had been reported at Kujikō in Iwate Prefecture as well as at Erimo on the northern island of Hokkaido.

The agency issued a tsunami advisory before dawn Friday for Japan’s entire Pacific coast, from Hokkaido in the north to Okinawa in the south.

Agency official Yohei Hasegawa said the waves reached northern Japan first and were moving toward the southwest. He said the agency expects the swelling of the waves would continue for a while and could go as high as 1 meter (40 inches), and urged residents to stay away from the coast.

Smaller waves have been detected across the country, up to 50 centimeters (20 inches) in Erimo on Hokkaido and 20 centimeters (8 inches) in Fukushima prefecture, home to the nuclear power plant destroyed by the 2011 disaster.

The northern Japanese coasts, especially those in Iwate, have been affected by tsunami induced by earthquakes near Chile in the past. In 1960, a tsunami exceeding 5 meters (16 feet) hit the area, leaving 139 people dead.

Quake Triggers Pacific-Wide Tsunami

The first tsunami waves struck Chile just minutes after the quake, and have since been fanning out across much of the Pacific Ocean. Outside of Chile, the highest observed tsunami waves have been in French Polynesia, a cluster of islands in the South Pacific; a 4.5-foot tsunami was reported at Nuku Hiva in that country’s Marquesas Islands at 7:33 a.m. U.S. EDT Thursday.

In the Hawaiian Islands, tsunami waves early Thursday morning reached a magnitude of 3 feet at Hilo and 2.2 feet in Kahului, Maui. The peak waves struck the state between 4 and 5 a.m. local time (9 and 10 a.m. EDT). A very small tsunami of just over 2 inches was also measured at Honolulu.

The Pacific Typhoon Warning Center has since canceled the tsunami advisory for Hawaii. Local officials urged people to stay off the beach and out of the water Thursday.

The U.S. government’s National Tsunami Warning Center also issued a tsunami advisory for Southern California, including coastal areas of the counties of San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Orange. The advisory was canceled at 12:19 p.m. PDT.

NTWC said tsunami waves were measured along most of the California coast. The highest measured tsunami wave was at Ventura, where the sea level peaked 1.1 feet above normal tide levels.

A tide gauge at Santa Monica, California, measured the initial tsunami wave early Thursday morning, with a fluctuation of about one foot in less than 15 minutes, according to the National Weather Service in Oxnard.

Very small tsunami waves were observed even farther north. Port Orford, Oregon, reported a 3-inch tsunami at 9:06 a.m. PDT. In Alaska, tsunami waves of around half a foot were measured at Nikolski and Sand Point early Thursday afternoon.

Such waves are not a danger to those on land, but they can create unusual and dangerous currents posing a danger to swimmers and boaters.

See full Article Here

Indigenous Knowledge and Disaster Risk Reduction International Network

Dialogues Between Indigenous Peoples and Disaster Risk Reduction

We are an international group of indigenous and non-indigenous scholars and practitioners, focusing on the role that indigenous peoples and their knowledge systems may play to inform understanding, decision-making and management of natural and human-made disasters.

We wish to advance the formation of an international and trans-disciplinary network on Indigenous Knowledge and Disaster Risk Reduction involving indigenous and non-indigenous researchers and other stakeholders.

Visit Indigenous Knowledge and Disaster Risk Reduction International Network Website for More Information

Hottest Year on Record

 

Scientists Declare 2015 The Hottest Year On Record Early, Will Win ‘By A Mile’

sun-heat-los-angeles-skyline

August 29, 2015

It’s only August, and climate scientists are already calling it – 2015 will be the hottest year on record.

To regular readers of the Inquisitr, this story may seem familiar. Roughly seven months ago, researchers declared 2014 the hottest year since record keeping started in 1880.

Soon, 2014 will move down to second in the ranking, according to early predictions. In 2014, the previous record was only beaten by a few hundredths of a degree, but 2015 is on track to beat the record by 0.1 degrees Celsius, according to NOAA climate scientist Jessica Blunden.

“I would expect that we could break the record by close to 0.1 Celsius. That’s the range we’re in now. It’s higher than we typically see when we break a record, where we see a hundredth or two-hundredths of a degree. So this is quite a large margin.”

The Independent reports that the top three hottest years will be 2015, 2014, and 2010 if the forecasts are correct. Likewise, the top ten hottest years all took place in the 21st century.

The oceans are also making a big difference in this year’s temperatures, according to Professor Phil Jones.

“What’s important is not so much the land but the ocean data. The oceans have really picked up in the last 12 months or so.”

He added that the way things are looking, 2015 will beat previous records “by a mile.”

The ocean temperatures are being affected by El Nino, which may carry on to next year.

Still, climate scientists have little doubt about the root cause of the heating.

Professor James Hansen from Columbia University in New York explained more.

“We know very well where the [extra] heat is coming from – increasing greenhouse gases, mainly carbon dioxide. These trap heat radiation, reducing heat radiation escaping to space, so the planet is out of balance, more energy coming in than going out. The Earth is steadily warming, albeit with ups-and-downs due to natural dynamic fluctuations such as El Niños, and competing natural forces such as volcanoes and solar variability.”

CNN reports that July was also the hottest month in the hottest year on record. The NOAA even said it could have been the hottest month in the past 4,000 years.

Compared to the global of average 20th century temperatures, July was 1.46 degrees higher. So, if this summer has seemed unusually hot, it’s not in your imagination.

The year 2016 might also get a head start for becoming the hottest year if the El Nino weather patterns continue into next Spring.

[Image Credit: wsj.com]

Full Article